Arts

Tornado watches and severe weather have been recorded across Lubbock and the South Plains.

On Monday evening, a tornado-warned thunderstorm with visible circulation rolled over Lubbock, one of many powerful storms moving through the South Plains on what forecasters warned would be a day of increased extreme weather risks.

Though there had been no confirmed tornado reports by 8:30 p.m., radar revealed a storm capable of creating a tornado had formed over Wolfforth shortly after 8:03 p.m. and was moving west towards Lubbock.
Hail and heavy rain were also recorded throughout the area.
After another series of heavy storms hit Lubbock and most of the area on Monday, the threat of extreme weather will last through Tuesday and beyond.

Lubbock and the South Plains Tornado

Tornado watches and severe weather have been recorded across Lubbock and the South Plains.
Tornado watches and severe weather have been recorded across Lubbock and the South Plains.

“There will be more chances for thunderstorms late Tuesday, Wednesday, and then again from Friday through next weekend,” according to a late Monday National Weather Service hazardous weather forecast. “Some of these storms may be moderate to extreme, with heavy rainfall,” says the forecaster.

The National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center placed a red bullseye over Lubbock and parts of the South Plains, stretching into the Rolling Plains and Big Country region, on Monday afternoon and evening, putting the area in a category 4 out of 5 “moderate risk” for severe weather.

A message from the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center reads, “Severe thunderstorms are

A tornado was observed in a line of thunderstorms northeast of Sudan, Texas, on Sunday evening.
A tornado was observed in a line of thunderstorms northeast of Sudan, Texas, on Sunday evening.

predicted across portions of the southern Plains later this afternoon and overnight.” “In northwest Texas, very large hail (some hailstones heavier than baseballs) and a few tornadoes are most likely.”

The increased storm threats, according to Charles Aldrich, a forecaster with the National Weather Service in Lubbock, should serve as an alert for citizens to track weather conditions through local media outlets and weather platforms.

“You never know how rapidly things pass and build around the city,” Aldrich said.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

16 − two =

Back to top button